Intentional Supervision

This article by Lyn Freundlich and Heather Harker originally appeared in Saving Land, Summer 2012.

This article by Lyn Freundlich and Heather Harker originally appeared in Saving Land, Summer 2012.

Summary

Focusing specifically on land trusts, this article builds the case that even in the smallest of organizations, effective supervision of staff and volunteers contributes directly to mission effectiveness. Traditional businesses develop mechanisms for ensuring that all parts of the system work well together and produce the desired outcome.

Nonprofits like land trusts need to do the same. Since our work isn’t automated and people carry out critical functions, intentional supervision of those people ensures that information about mission, goals and even specific tasks flows smoothly.

Boards and staff can create an intentional culture of supervision which recognizes the role supervision plays in organizational success and effectiveness. The authors explore the characteristics that define a culture of supervision:

  • Clarity around roles, responsibilities and tasks
  • Regular, well-planned, one-on-one meetings
  • Trust and transparency

Though intentional supervision can be time consuming, they make the case that it may well be the best investment an organization can make.

Download the full PDF (free) to learn more.

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